Global emissions set to rise in 2017 after three years, scientists warn

Global emissions set to rise in 2017 after three years, scientists warn

Global emissions set to rise in 2017 after three years, scientists warn

UEA's Tyndall Center for Climate Change Research director Corinne Le Quéré said in a statement, "With global Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities estimated at 41 billion tonnes for 2017, time is running out on our ability to keep warming well below two degrees Celsius, let alone 1.5 degrees Celsius".

Global carbon dioxide emissions are on track to rise slightly this year after three years of staying flat, new research shows.

After being stable for three consecutive years, carbon dioxide emissions are up in 2017, reports an global team of scientists.

"The slowdown in emissions growth from 2014 to 2016 was always a delicate balance, and the likely 2% increase in 2017 clearly demonstrates that we can't take the recent slowdown for granted", said Robbie Andrew, a senior researcher at CICERO, the Centre for International Climate Research in Oslo, and co-author of the studies. This stable period, following a growth in emissions of more than 3% annually in the 2000s, fed hopes that many countries were succeeding in separating successful economy-building from increases in world temperatures.

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The GCP expects India's emissions to rise by 2%, much lower than the 6% per year averaged over the previous decade, because of significant government interventions in the economy. Still, the report estimates that US carbon emissions will likely fall this year by 0.4 percent - despite the Trump administration's policies favoring fossil fuels over renewable energy.

But as the Trump administration continues to push fossil fuel use at home and overseas, the Global Carbon Budget's scientists warn that the world is running out of time to tackle climate change.

The annual report released Monday by the Global Carbon Project provides fuel to environmentalists to argue that the slowdown in emissions growth was more of a fluke than the start of a pattern. "This demonstrates that we can not be complacent that the emissions would stay flat", Glen P Peters, Center for International Climate Research in Oslo (CICERO), said at a press conference in Bonn, where the current round of climate talks are under way.

From 2014 to 2016 global Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels and industry grew hardly at all. "This would essentially mean that we need to have policies to lock in the gains we have had in the last few years", Peters said.

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Despite the noted increase in emissions due to the burning of fossil fuels, the United States' official position at the Bonn climate talks has been to support the use of fossil fuels as solutions to climate change.

A team of 76 scientists from 57 institutions in 15 countries working under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project said despite the growth in 2017, it is too early to say whether this is a one-off event on the way to a global peak in emissions, or the beginning of a new period with upward pressure on the growth of global emissions.

The research was conducted by University of East Anglia and the Global Carbon Project and the findings were published today simultaneously in the journals Nature Climate Change, Earth System Science Data Discussions and Environmental Research Letters.

"With global Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities estimated at 41 billion tonnes for 2017, time is running out on our ability to keep warming well below 2ºC, let alone 1.5ºC, she said".

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